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Let The Rhythm Hit ‘Em: How Hip-Hop Became Boxing’s Biggest Motivator

The following is an excerpt from Beatboxing: How Hip-Hop Changed the Fight Game, by Todd D. Snyder. This is a section from Chapter 3 “Let The Rhythm Hit ‘Em”, pages 57-62. Copyright © 2021 Todd D. Snyder. *** The story of how hip-hop music became the official soundtrack to boxing gyms around the world parallels the culture’s meteoric rise to mainstream popularity. Long before rap music took over the Billboard charts, break dancing captured the imagination of the American public. In the early days of hip-hop, the emerging dance form served as the main physical expression of the culture’s rhythmic sensibilities. Pioneering DJs such as DJ Kool Herc, Afrika Bambaataa, and Grandmaster Flash perfected the art of isolating

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Diss KO’s: Rap’s Best Disrespectful Punchlines

Todd D. Snyder’s Top Five (Disrespectful) Boxing References in Hip-Hop Songs This article is written by Todd D. Snyder, author of Beatboxing: How Hip-Hop Changed the Fight Game (November 16, 2021). This “Top Five” post is part of a series leading up to the publication of Beatboxing. See the previous article on “The Top Five Boxer Cameos in Rap Videos.” *** The stories I tell in Beatboxing: How-Hop Changed the Fight Game focus largely on hip-hop’s impact on professional boxing. I say largely because it would be wrong to assume the influence isn’t reciprocal. No musical genre comes close to covering the sport of boxing like hip-hop. If you were to compile a list of hip-hop’s most important and influential albums,

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“I Have Come to Destroy”: Marvin Hagler Prepares for War

Marvin Hagler at Tocco’s Ringside Gym in Las Vegas, Nevada, on April 11, 1985, where he trained for what would end up being all out WAR versus Thomas Hearns on April 15, 1985. Credit: Jim Wilson/Boston Globe Staff/File. The following is an excerpt from The War: Hagler–Hearns and Three Rounds for the Ages, by Don Stradley. This section was selected from pages 120–124 of Chapter 7, “A FERRARI AND A BAZOOKA.” Copyright © Don Stradley, September 2021  *** A strange thing happened as April 15 neared. Hagler and Hearns were reversing roles. The change was noticeable in how they dealt with reporters. Hearns, who had talked endlessly during the press tour, was talking less, while Hagler was becoming more accessible.

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Blog

Let The Rhythm Hit ‘Em: How Hip-Hop Became Boxing’s Biggest Motivator

The following is an excerpt from Beatboxing: How Hip-Hop Changed the Fight Game, by Todd D. Snyder. This is a section from Chapter 3 “Let The Rhythm Hit ‘Em”, pages 57-62. Copyright © 2021 Todd D. Snyder. *** The story of how hip-hop music became the official soundtrack to boxing gyms around the world parallels the culture’s meteoric rise to mainstream popularity. Long before rap music took over the Billboard charts, break dancing captured the imagination of the American public. In the early days of hip-hop, the emerging dance form served as the main physical expression of the culture’s rhythmic sensibilities. Pioneering DJs such as DJ Kool Herc, Afrika Bambaataa, and Grandmaster Flash perfected the art of isolating

Read More >

Diss KO’s: Rap’s Best Disrespectful Punchlines

Todd D. Snyder’s Top Five (Disrespectful) Boxing References in Hip-Hop Songs This article is written by Todd D. Snyder, author of Beatboxing: How Hip-Hop Changed the Fight Game (November 16, 2021). This “Top Five” post is part of a series leading up to the publication of Beatboxing. See the previous article on “The Top Five Boxer Cameos in Rap Videos.” *** The stories I tell in Beatboxing: How-Hop Changed the Fight Game focus largely on hip-hop’s impact on professional boxing. I say largely because it would be wrong to assume the influence isn’t reciprocal. No musical genre comes close to covering the sport of boxing like hip-hop. If you were to compile a list of hip-hop’s most important and influential albums,

Read More >

“I Have Come to Destroy”: Marvin Hagler Prepares for War

Marvin Hagler at Tocco’s Ringside Gym in Las Vegas, Nevada, on April 11, 1985, where he trained for what would end up being all out WAR versus Thomas Hearns on April 15, 1985. Credit: Jim Wilson/Boston Globe Staff/File. The following is an excerpt from The War: Hagler–Hearns and Three Rounds for the Ages, by Don Stradley. This section was selected from pages 120–124 of Chapter 7, “A FERRARI AND A BAZOOKA.” Copyright © Don Stradley, September 2021  *** A strange thing happened as April 15 neared. Hagler and Hearns were reversing roles. The change was noticeable in how they dealt with reporters. Hearns, who had talked endlessly during the press tour, was talking less, while Hagler was becoming more accessible.

Read More >